Vox Populi

A Public Sphere for Poetry, Politics, and Nature

Jose Padua: From the Belly to the Head

In my twenties when I was still living
with my mother and father and brothers
in the house I grew up in, I would always
hear from certain friends, “Why are you
still living at home?” The short answer
was that they wanted me there; the long one
that we ate rice for breakfast, eggs with
marinated pork for dinner; had paintings
of tiny houses on stilts with thatched roofs
that let in a lot of air, a plaque displaying
The Weapons of Moroland that reminded
my mother and father of the islands
they came from; displayed on the living room table
wooden carvings of caribaos pulling heavy carts,
headhunters carrying their enemies’ heads;
if you came into our house you ate in our house;
those of you who wouldn’t eat, how could you
expect us to trust you? In my immigrant culture
the custom was for children to live at home with
the family, to contribute to that home, and continue
to do so until they had families of their own,
but I never said that, never explained, never
wanted to say my people do things differently
because there’s nothing like having to state
the obvious for breaking already tenuous bonds
and at the time I wasn’t quite ready to be on my
own. Because being my friend was like going to
one of those stores where nothing has a price tag:
if you had to ask how much it was you couldn’t
afford it, and if you had to ask why I lived where
I lived, you couldn’t be my friend for very long.
And although I wanted to be American like
everyone else, I understood what it meant to stay
in touch with ground that wasn’t right beneath me,
a home that was on the other side of the earth,
teaching me, molding me, giving me strength.
Today I live in my own house with my own family;
if you know the right questions to ask and what not to ask,
I welcome you to come in, rest your feet, have a drink
and a bite to eat; I welcome you to come in and look around
so you can see the world from here, so you’ll know and feel,
from your belly to your head, what’s going on now.


Copyright 2019 Jose Padua

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Photograph by Jose Padua

One comment on “Jose Padua: From the Belly to the Head

  1. Annie Dalton
    January 17, 2019

    I love this poem, thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

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This entry was posted on January 15, 2019 by in Poetry, Social Justice and tagged , , , .

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