Vox Populi

A Public Sphere for Poetry, Politics, and Nature

Walter Bargen: Real Rumors

Now that it’s done being undone, or, at least, the end of the beginning of undone, depending on the harrumphing water pumps and which side of the bulldozer blade is … Continue reading

January 19, 2018 · Leave a comment

Marc Jampole: Pentagon proposes using nuclear weapons against terrorists

The Pentagon’s new Nuclear Posture Review calls for dropping nuclear bombs on countries that harbor terrorists.  The draft of the Pentagon’s proposed plan to “update” the United States’ nuclear weapon … Continue reading

January 18, 2018 · Leave a comment

Robert Okaji: Sometimes Love is a Dry Gutter

Or a restless leaf, a footprint.   Is fault on a blameless day, scrawled on a washed-out sky.   My friend’s music orbits his home, worms through the cracks in … Continue reading

January 17, 2018 · 6 Comments

Frances Moore Lappé: Farming for a Small Planet

How we grow food determines who can eat and who cannot—no matter how much we produce. People yearn for alternatives to industrial agriculture, but they are worried. They see large-scale … Continue reading

January 17, 2018 · 3 Comments

Kyle Harper: How climate change and disease helped the fall of Rome

At some time or another, every historian of Rome has been asked to say where we are, today, on Rome’s cycle of decline. Historians might squirm at such attempts to … Continue reading

January 16, 2018 · 1 Comment

Frida Berrigan: “Do Kids Die, Mom?”

Facing the Future With Trepidation in the Age of Trump As a mother and an activist, here’s what I’ve concluded as 2018 begins: it’s getting harder and harder to think … Continue reading

January 10, 2018 · 2 Comments

David Korten: How to Restore Our Relationship to Earth

We must reduce our burden on Earth’s regenerative systems by approximately 40 percent. To have a viable human future on this overstressed planet, it is essential that we build a … Continue reading

January 9, 2018 · 2 Comments

Sarah van Gelder: Feeling Burned Out? When We Gather, We Get Energized

If it feels like you and the people you know have no say over what happens in Washington, D.C., that’s not an illusion. Research shows that ordinary people have close … Continue reading

January 8, 2018 · Leave a comment

Judith Brice and Charles W. Brice: Two Winter Poems

. Today, Of White                                        After ‘Early Spring Thaw’ by Di Brandt   Today my bones shudder and shake— quake with the wanton cold of winter her snows of white … Continue reading

January 6, 2018 · Leave a comment

John Samuel Tieman: Tell Me

I thought there was a lesson in the river when the current is frozen we do know the ice just waits I want to know what you know about age … Continue reading

January 5, 2018 · Leave a comment

Daniel R. Cobb: Turn Left Here

What a god-awful year. 2017 has been a year of anguished outrage and quiet condolences, of trying to find a way to cope with the travesty that brought us Donald … Continue reading

December 31, 2017 · 8 Comments

Paul Christensen: The End of the Year

The days are paper thin at this time of year, like the onion skin my mother wrote her letters on. The hours slip along toward evening, and then evening congeals … Continue reading

December 31, 2017 · Leave a comment

George Monbiot: The Unseen World

To be aware of the wonders of the living planet is to take on an unbearable burden of grief. What you see is not what others see. We inhabit parallel … Continue reading

December 30, 2017 · Leave a comment

Audio: Merry it is while summer lasts (1225 AD)

. Recorded by Ensemble Belladonna, “Miri it is while sumer ilast” is considered the oldest surviving secular English song. Unfortunately only one verse survives: Miri it is while sumer ilast … Continue reading

December 30, 2017 · Leave a comment