Vox Populi

Vox Populi: A Public Sphere for Politics and Poetry

Barack Obama: What My Mother Taught Me About Love

She sighed, running her hands through her hair. “We were so young, you know. I was younger than you are now. He was only a few years older than that…”

She stopped and laughed to herself. “Did I ever tell you that he was late for our first date? He asked me to meet him in front of the university library at one. When I got there he hadn’t arrived, but I figured I’d give him a few minutes. It was a nice day, so I laid out on one of the benches, and before I knew it I had fallen asleep. Well, an hour later — an hour! — he shows up with a couple of his friends. I woke up and the three of them were standing over me, and I heard your father saying, serious as can be, ‘You see, gentlemen. I told you that she was a fine girl, and that she would wait for me.

My mother laughed once more, and once again I saw her as the child she had been. Except this time I saw something else: In her smiling, slightly puzzled face, I saw what all children must see at some point if they are to grow up — their parents’ lives revealed to them as separate and apart, reaching out beyond the point of their union or the birth of a child, lives unfurling back to grandparents, great-grandparents, an infinite number of chance meetings, misunderstandings, projected hopes, limited circumstances. My mother was that girl with the movie of beautiful black people in her head, flattered by my father’s attention, confused and alone, trying to break out of the grip of her own parents’ lives. The innocence she carried that day, waiting for my father, had been tinged with misconceptions, her own needs. But it was a guileless need, one without self-consciousness, and perhaps that’s how any love begins, impulses and cloudy images that allow us to break across our solitude, and then, if we’re lucky, are finally transformed into something firmer. What I heard from my mother that day, speaking about my father, was … the love of someone who knows your life in the round, a love that will survive disappointment. She saw my father as everyone hopes at least one other person might see him; she had tried to help the child who never knew him see him in the same way. And it was the look on her face that day that I would remember when a few months later I called to tell her that my father had died and heard her cry out over the distance.

Perhaps that’s how any love begins, impulses and cloudy images that allow us to break across our solitude, and then, if we’re lucky, are finally transformed into something firmer.

Michelle is a tremendously strong person, and has a very strong sense of herself and who she is and where she comes from. But I also think in her eyes you can see a trace of vulnerability that most people don’t know, because when she’s walking through the world she is this tall, beautiful, confident woman. There is a part of her that is vulnerable and young and sometimes frightened, and I think seeing both of those things is what attracted me to her.

What sustains our relationship is I’m extremely happy with her, and part of it has to do with the fact that she is at once completely familiar to me, so that I can be myself and she knows me very well and I trust her completely, but at the same time she is also a complete mystery to me in some ways. And there are times when we are lying in bed and I look over and sort of have a start. Because I realize here is this other person who is separate and different and has different memories and backgrounds and thoughts and feelings. It’s that tension between familiarity and mystery that makes for something strong, because, even as you build a life of trust and comfort and mutual support, you retain some sense of surprise or wonder about the other person.


 

The first three sections were written by Barack Obama in 1990 for a manuscript that eventually became Dreams Of My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance. The last two sections are from Mariana Cook’s 1996 interview with Barack and Michelle Obama.

These passages were quoted by Maria Popova in Brainpickings.

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barackmichelleobama_marianacook

Barack and Michelle Obama, 1996 (Photograph: Mariana Cook)

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barackobama_mother

Stanley Ann Obama with young Barack

One comment on “Barack Obama: What My Mother Taught Me About Love

  1. sharondoubiago
    January 5, 2017

    Thank you. Such an attitude is how I forgive my mother. My orphan mother.  _______________________________________Recent online posts by Vox Populi:https://voxpopulisphere.com/2016/07/05/sharon-doubiago-free-him/;  https://voxpopulisphere.com/2015/05/14/6776/ (Preface to The Visit: “I Am My Brother’s Keeper”); https://voxpopulisphere.com/2015/06/27/sharon-doubiago-mass-execution-of-aboriginal-children-of-the-mohawk-residential-school-brantford-ontario-1943/; https://voxpopulisphere.com/2015/01/16/sharon-doubiago-abu-ghraib-guantanamo-bay/PublicationsHard Country,West End Press (epic poem); The Book of Seeing With One’s Own Eyes, Graywolf Press (stories); El Nino, Lost Roads (stories); Psyche Drives the Coast, Empty Bowl Press (poetry); South America Mi Hija, U of Pittsburgh (booklength poem); The Husband Arcane     The Arcane of O, Gorda Plate Press (booklengthpoem); Body and Soul, Cedar HillPublications (poetry); Love on the Streets,U of Pittsburgh (poetry); My Father’sLove, Vols 1 & 2, Portrait of thePoet as a Child/as a Woman, Wild Ocean, (memoir); The Visit, Wild Ocean Press (booklength poem); I, Poet, Omerta Publications (sequenced poems)

    From: Vox Populi To: sharondoubiago@yahoo.com Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2017 2:00 AM Subject: [New post] Barack Obama: What My Mother Taught Me About Love #yiv8162573326 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv8162573326 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv8162573326 a.yiv8162573326primaryactionlink:link, #yiv8162573326 a.yiv8162573326primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv8162573326 a.yiv8162573326primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv8162573326 a.yiv8162573326primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv8162573326 WordPress.com | Vox Populi posted: “She sighed, running her hands through her hair. “We were so young, you know. I was younger than you are now. He was only a few years older than that…”She stopped and laughed to herself. “Did I ever tell you that he was late for our first date? He aske” | |

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