Vox Populi

Vox Populi: A Public Sphere for Politics and Poetry

Video: “Strange Fruit” sung by Billie Holiday

Billie Holiday (born Eleanora Fagan; April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959) was an American jazz singer and songwriter. Nicknamed “Lady Day” by her friend and musical partner Lester Young, Holiday had a seminal influence on jazz and pop singing. Her vocal style, strongly inspired by jazz instrumentalists, pioneered a new way of manipulating phrasing and tempo.

“Strange Fruit” originated as a poem written by American writer, teacher and songwriter Abel Meeropol under his pseudonym Lewis Allan, as a protest against lynchings. In the poem, Meeropol expressed his horror at lynchings, inspired by Lawrence Beitler’s photograph of the 1930 lynching of Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith in Marion, Indiana. He published the poem under the title “Bitter Fruit” in 1937 in The New York Teacher, a union magazine. Meeropol later set the poem to music. His protest song gained a certain success in and around New York. Meeropol, his wife, and black vocalist Laura Duncan performed it at Madison Square Garden.

Billie Holiday first performed the song at Cafe Society in 1939. Because of the power of the song, the manager of the cafe drew up some rules: Holiday would close with it; the waiters would stop all service in advance; the room would be in darkness except for a spotlight on Holiday’s face; and there would be no encore. During the musical introduction, Holiday stood with her eyes closed, as if she were evoking a prayer.

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Billie Holiday February 1947

One comment on “Video: “Strange Fruit” sung by Billie Holiday

  1. Ellen Greenlaw
    August 28, 2016

    Racism off the Planet. The police killings of black persons continue this legacy today. Enough! All black lives matter.

    Liked by 1 person

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This entry was posted on April 19, 2015 by in Poetry and tagged , , , , , .
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