Vox Populi

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Kathryn Levy: At the End of the World

she keeps washing the dishes—they
have to be clean for the
dinners of tomorrow—
and watching explosions
in some distant country

May 30, 2022 · 9 Comments

Mike Schneider: Spring Mills

Stars & stripes ripple from the pole.
An old willow leans over the water,
strand after strand of green tears.

May 30, 2022 · 6 Comments

Kim Stafford: Top Hit

But comrades, if we kill him, someone will make
a martyr song and it will become the anthem sung
by thousands in the streets

April 14, 2022 · 1 Comment

Rachel Hadas: ‘Laugh right in its face’ – a poet reflects on her craft’s defiant role in the middle of a war

Poets write poetry to help them come to terms with the terror of their times. The process of writing those poems, and the process of reading them, both offer respite.

April 3, 2022 · 3 Comments

Richard Hoffman: The Road

the groves and orchards
poisoned, fathers and brothers tortured,
hope abandoned with the other heavy furniture
it isn’t much of a road, the future

March 31, 2022 · Leave a comment

Kim Stafford: Four poems about the current war

How much rain to fill the Volga?
Not soon, the end of weeping.

March 13, 2022 · 10 Comments

Edwin Muir: The Horses

Barely a twelvemonth after
The seven days war that put the world to sleep,
Late in the evening the strange horses came.
By then we had made our covenant with silence

March 11, 2022 · Leave a comment

James Dubinsky: Veterans turned poets can help bridge divides

Today, there are approximately 20.17 million veterans – 7 percent of the U.S. population. That’s more than 20 million stories, along with the stories of their loved ones. Sometimes poetry is the most effective way to capture both the ambiguity and the story.

November 11, 2021 · 1 Comment

H.D. (Hilda Doolittle): The Walls Do Not Fall

tendons, muscles shattered, outer husk dismembered,
yet the frame held:
we passed the flame: we wonder
what saved us? what for?

August 20, 2021 · Leave a comment

Siegfried Sassoon: ‘The Hero’

The cruelty in this poem is overwhelming – as Sassoon intended. So opposed was he to jingoistic propaganda, he deliberately slashed very tender imagery with the sharpest irony.

April 23, 2021 · 1 Comment

Henry Beston: A Year of life on the Great Beach of Cape Cod

The three great elemental sounds in nature are the sound of rain, the sound of wind in a primeval wood, and the sound of outer ocean on a beach. I have heard them all, and of the three elemental voices, that of ocean is the most awesome, beautiful and varied.

September 6, 2020 · 1 Comment

W. D. Ehrhart: Paul Fussell — A Remembrance

While Fussell wrote on a wide variety of subjects over his long life—ranging from Augustan humanism, Samuel Johnson, and Kingsley Amis to the 2nd Amendment, the Indianapolis 500, and travel in between-the-wars Europe—war, the irony of war, the suffering and lunacy and permanent damage of war, the unfairness of war, lay at the heart of his writing and of his being.

May 31, 2020 · 3 Comments

Siegfried Sassoon: Grandeur of Ghosts

How can they use such names and be not humble?
I have sat silent; angry at what they uttered.

May 25, 2020 · 4 Comments

Matthew Hollis: Edward Thomas, Robert Frost and the road to war

When Thomas and Frost met in London in 1913, neither had yet made his name as a poet. They became close, and each was vital to the other’s success. But then Frost wrote ‘The Road Not Taken’, which brought Thomas to an irreversible decision.

October 25, 2019 · Leave a comment

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