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Video: Wolf Pack

A masterwork of nature filmmaking that helped transform how wolves are seen

Bill Mason (1929-1988) was a Canadian naturalist, author, artist, filmmaker, and conservationist celebrated for his films exploring his country’s vast wilderness. Perhaps his best work is a trio of films about wolves – Death of a Legend (1971), Cry of the Wild (1972) and Wolf Pack (1974) – aimed at educating the public and dispelling negative myths about the animals. In Wolf Pack, the shortest of the trilogy, Mason chronicles the lives of wolves facing the dramatic changes of the seasons over the course of a year, elucidating the central role of social hierarchies and cycles in their lives. With profound respect and admiration for the wolves permeating each sequence, Mason finds brutality and beauty in the pack’s perpetual struggle for survival, creating an iconic entry in the crowded field of nature documentaries.

Director: Bill Mason

Website: National Film Board of Canada

Running time: 20 minutes

Email subscribers may click on the title of this post to watch the film.

One comment on “Video: Wolf Pack

  1. Barbara Huntington
    February 13, 2022

    Will look forward to watching.

    Liked by 1 person

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This entry was posted on February 13, 2022 by in Art and Cinema, Environmentalism, Opinion Leaders and tagged , , , .

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