Vox Populi

A Public Sphere for Poetry, Politics, and Nature

Ursula K. Le Guin: About Anger

In the consciousness-raising days of the second wave of feminism, we made a big deal out of anger, the anger of women. We praised it and cultivated it as a virtue. We learned to boast of being angry, to swagger our rage, to play the Fury.

We were right to do so. We were telling women who believed they should patiently endure insults, injuries, and abuse that they had every reason to be angry. We were rousing people to feel and see injustice, the methodical mistreatment to which women were subjected, the almost universal disrespect of the human rights of women, and to resent and refuse it for themselves and for others. Indignation, forcibly expressed, is an appropriate response to injustice. Indignation draws strength from outrage, and outrage draws strength from rage. There is a time for anger, and that was such a time.

Anger points powerfully to the denial of rights, but the exercise of rights can’t live and thrive on anger. It lives and thrives on the dogged pursuit of justice.

Anger continued on past its usefulness becomes unjust, then dangerous. Nursed for its own sake, valued as an end in itself, it loses its goal. It fuels not positive activism but regression, obsession, vengeance, self-righteousness. Corrosive, it feeds off itself, destroying its host in the process.

I find the subject very troubling, because though I want to see myself as a woman of strong feeling but peaceable instincts, I have to realize how often anger fuels my acts and thoughts, how very often I indulge in anger.

Considered a virtue, given free expression at all times, as we wanted women’s anger against injustice to be, what would it do? Certainly, an outburst of anger can cleanse the soul and clear the air. But anger nursed and nourished begins to act like anger suppressed: it begins to poison the air with vengefulness, spitefulness, distrust, breeding grudge and resentment, brooding endlessly over the causes of the grudge, the righteousness of the resentment. A brief, open expression of anger in the right moment, aimed at its true target, is effective — anger is a good weapon. But a weapon is appropriate to, justified only by, a situation of danger.

One view of clinical depression explains it as sourced in suppressed anger. Anger turned, perhaps, against the self, because fear — fear of being harmed, and fear of doing harm — prevents the anger from turning against the people or circumstances causing it.

If so, no wonder a lot of people are depressed, and no wonder so many of them are women. They are living with an unexploded bomb.

I see in the lives of people I know how crippling a deep and deeply suppressed anger is. It comes from pain, and it causes pain. What is the way to use anger to fuel something other than hurt, to direct it away from hatred, vengefulness, self-righteousness, and make it serve creation and compassion?


These quotations are from Ursula K. Le Guin’s essay “About Anger” included in her book No Time to Spare: Thinking about What Matters.

Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (1929 – 2018) was an American author best known for her works of speculative fiction, including science fiction works set in her Hainish universe, and the Earthsea fantasy series. She was first published in 1959, and her literary career spanned nearly sixty years, yielding more than twenty novels and over a hundred short stories, in addition to poetry, literary criticism, translations, and children’s books.

Ursula K Le Guin, photographed in Portland in 2008. Photograph: Benjamin Reed/WriterPictures

3 comments on “Ursula K. Le Guin: About Anger

  1. rosemaryboehm
    January 30, 2021

    Ursula Le Guin, your voice is need. Now more than ever. But what you said is still valid today:

    “Anger continued on past its usefulness becomes unjust, then dangerous. Nursed for its own sake, valued as an end in itself, it loses its goal. It fuels not positive activism but regression, obsession, vengeance, self-righteousness. Corrosive, it feeds off itself, destroying its host in the process.”

    But it’s still being roused. Let’s be angry when it’s necessary and tune it down when things have changed. Step by painful step.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Lex Runciman
    January 30, 2021

    Thanks for this. Le Guin’s memorial service here was one of the most powerful public gatherings of its type that I’ve ever seen. She’s missed, and, read.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Vox Populi
      January 30, 2021

      Thanks, Lex. Le Guin has been my favorite writer since I read the Earthsea trilogy when I was a boy.

      Liked by 1 person

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This entry was posted on January 30, 2021 by in Health and Nutrition, Opinion Leaders, Personal Essays, Social Justice and tagged , , .

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