Vox Populi

A Public Sphere for Poetry, Politics, and Nature

Siegfried Sassoon: Grandeur of Ghosts

When I have heard small talk about great men
I climb to bed; light my two candles; then
Consider what was said; and put aside
What Such-a-one remarked and Someone-else replied.

They have spoken lightly of my deathless friends,
(Lamps for my gloom, hands guiding where I stumble,)
Quoting, for shallow conversational ends,
What Shelley shrilled, what Blake once wildly muttered ….

How can they use such names and be not humble?
I have sat silent; angry at what they uttered.
The dead bequeathed them life; the dead have said
What these can only memorize and mumble.


Public Domain

Siegfried Sassoon (1886 – 1967) was an English poet, writer, and soldier. Decorated for bravery on the Western Front, he became one of the leading poets of the First World War. His poetry both described the horrors of the trenches and satirized the patriotic pretensions of those who, in Sassoon’s view, were responsible for a jingoism-fuelled war. Sassoon became a focal point for dissent within the armed forces when he made a lone protest against the continuation of the war in his “Soldier’s Declaration” of 1917, culminating in his admission to a military psychiatric hospital; this resulted in his forming a friendship with Wilfred Owen, who was greatly influenced by him. Sassoon later won acclaim for his prose work, notably his three-volume fictionalised autobiography, collectively known as the “Sherston trilogy”. (adapted from Wikipedia)

4 comments on “Siegfried Sassoon: Grandeur of Ghosts

  1. loranneke
    May 25, 2020

    Thank you for this poem, Michael. I know Owen’s poems better than I know Sassoon’s — so that’s my goal for today: discover more of Sassoon’s poems…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Jose Alcantara
    May 25, 2020

    Thanks, Michael. I did not know of this man or his Soldier’s Declaration. It’s always good to be reminded that people of courage and character do exist.

    Liked by 1 person

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