Vox Populi

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Audio: T.S. Eliot reads “Burnt Norton”

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Burnt Norton is the first poem of T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets. He created it while working on his play Murder in the Cathedral and it was first published in his Collected Poems 1909–1935 (1936). The poem’s title refers to a Cotswolds manor house Eliot visited, and the manor’s garden serves as an important image within the poem.

Structurally, the poem is based on Eliot’s The Waste Land with passages of the poem related to those excised from Murder in the Cathedral. The central discussion within the poem concerns the nature of time and salvation. Eliot emphasises the need of the individual to focus on the present moment and to know that there is a universal order. By understanding the nature of time and the order of the universe, mankind is able to recognise God and seek redemption.

[Text adapted from Wikipedia]

220px-Thomas_Stearns_Eliot_by_Lady_Ottoline_Morrell_(1934)

T. S. Eliot in 1934

4 comments on “Audio: T.S. Eliot reads “Burnt Norton”

  1. Pingback: Audio: T.S. Eliot reads “Burnt Norton” | paradiselostsite

  2. Luz Vega-Hidlago
    April 3, 2016

    Beautiful, I love T. S. Elliot. He always retained the pain of the nihilist in his verses, a group of artist who were cultivated in the ordered world of the Victorian era, and who suddenly suffered the shock of World War one’s total warfare. I wonder If they were the only generation after World War one, who experienced that shift/difference; but their written testimony is that they were devastated to a degree never experience before in war. Perhaps they were the only generation after World War one who experienced that shift between, the order and faith on human reason of the Victorians, and the sudden chaos and surrealism of the Modern world. We on the other hand have been raised to expect it…But then again I wonder, if the shock of total warfare, and it’s terrifying violence which is recorded as the greatest shock, was more so to the upper classes and their artist of the time. Because perhaps such irrational devastating terror was not as shocking to the poor and exploited industrial working class of that time. However that possibility does not diminish the suffering brought about by the irrationality and devouring fury of World War one.

    http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jul/21/entertainment/la-et-cm-world-war-art-20120722

    “Of all the wars, that is the one that seems to explain us best,” said Michael Morpurgo, the English author of the novel “War Horse,” about a Devonshire farm boy’s death-defying bond with his noble steed Joey, on which the National Theatre of GreatBritain’sproduction is based.

    Particularly in his country, he said, World War I resonates louder than the even greater cataclysm that followed it 20 years later. “The First World War for British people is very much a part of who we are,” Morpurgo said during a visit to Los Angeles. “It’s so deep in us; the poetry, the stories, the loss, the suffering is there in every village churchyard.”

    During and after World War I, flowery Victorian language was blown apart and replaced by more sinewy and R-rated prose styles. In visual art, Surrealists and Expressionists devised wobbly, chopped-up perspectives and nightmarish visions of fractured human bodies and splintered societies slouching toward moral chaos

    0120722…From the fiction of Hemingway to the savagely critical paintings of Otto Dix, WWI reshaped the notion of art, just as it forever altered the perception of war.”

    From “Art forever changed by World War I” July 21, 2012

    – by Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times

    http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jul/21/entertainment/la-et-cm-world-war-art-20120722

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Luz Vega-Hidlago
    April 3, 2016

    Beautiful, I love T. S. Elliot. He always retained the pain of the nihilist in his verses, a group of artist who were cultivated in the ordered world of the Victorian era and who suddenly suffered the shock of World War One’s Total war fare. I wonder of they were the only generation who experienced that shift/difference, but they were devastated. Perhaps they were the only generation that experienced that diference. We on the other hand are raised ot expect it…

    http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jul/21/entertainment/la-et-cm-world-war-art-2

    “Of all the wars, that is the one that seems to explain us best,” said Michael Morpurgo, the English author of the novel “War Horse,” about a Devonshire farm boy’s death-defying bond with his noble steed Joey, on which the National Theatre of GreatBritain’sproduction is based.

    Particularly in his country, he said, World War I resonates louder than the even greater cataclysm that followed it 20 years later. “The First World War for British people is very much a part of who we are,” Morpurgo said during a visit to Los Angeles. “It’s so deep in us; the poetry, the stories, the loss, the suffering is there in every village churchyard.”

    During and after World War I, flowery Victorian language was blown apart and replaced by more sinewy and R-rated prose styles. In visual art, Surrealists and Expressionists devised wobbly, chopped-up perspectives and nightmarish visions of fractured human bodies and splintered societies slouching toward moral chaos
    0120722…From the fiction of Hemingway to the savagely critical paintings of Otto Dix, WWI reshaped the notion of art, just as it forever altered the perception of war.”

    “Art forever changed by World War I”, July 21, 2012
    |- By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: Audio: T.S. Eliot reads “Burnt Norton” — Vox Populi – winered458312example

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This entry was posted on April 3, 2016 by in Opinion Leaders, Poetry and tagged , .
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